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Whooping crane nest with two eggs.

Whooping crane nest on Necedah National Wildlife Refuge in 2014.

Photo by U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

 


Individual information for each whooping crane in the eastern flock.

Revised April 27, 2017

 

In the PDF document, click on the hatch year to view more information about the individual whooping crane.

 

May 1, 2017 Project Update

Here is the most recent update for the Eastern Migratory Population of Whooping Cranes. In the last month, breeding Whooping Cranes have begun nesting.

 

Population Estimate

The current maximum population size is 99 (45 F, 52 M, 2 U). As of 1 May, at least 86 Whooping Cranes have been confirmed in Wisconsin, 1 in Illinois, and 1 in Tennessee. The remaining birds’ locations have not been reported during April.

 

Reproduction

To date there have been 24 confirmed nests by 23 pairs in Juneau, Adams, Marathon, St. Croix, and Green Lake counties, Wisconsin. This year marks the first nest of a parent-reared Whooping Crane in the EMP as well as the first nest in the Eastern Rectangle. There are currently five active first nests and two active re-nests. One of these nests may have hatched 30 April, but it has yet to be confirmed. Four nests failed naturally, and eggs from 13 nests were collected as a part of the forced re-nesting experiment. Chicks hatched from these eggs will be released into the Eastern Migratory Population in the fall of 2017. We expect re-nesting by pairs whose first nests failed to begin during May.

 

Continue Project Update »

 


 

News Release: Whooping Cranes notch nesting milestones in Wisconsin

April 27, 2017

 

MADISON, Wis. - Whooping Cranes returning to Wisconsin this spring have achieved two important milestones toward establishing a self-sustaining flock of this ancient and endangered species in eastern North America.

 

A pair has nested for the first time at White River Marsh Wildlife Area, marking a welcome expansion of nesting range in Wisconsin and providing an important backstop to Necedah National Wildlife Refuge, where most of the returning cranes have nested to date.

 

And another pair of cranes nesting in Necedah claimed the crown of the first nest in Wisconsin resulting from a released ‘parent-reared’ bird, a bird reared by a parent crane in captivity, not by costumed human caretakers.

 

The “Royal Couple” is involved in another “first:” their nest is being monitored by “citizen scientists” and many other online observers on a live-streaming video camera recently set up by Operation Migration. “This is the FIRST TIME EVER that a Whooping Crane nest has been monitored by camera 24 hours a day, seven days a week!” Duff says. View the Royal Couple nesting at https://www.youtube.com/c/OperationMigration/live.

 

Read more »

 


 

April 1, 2107, Project Update

Here is the most recent update for the Eastern Migratory Population of Whooping Cranes. During February, most Whooping Cranes began migration and at least one has returned to Wisconsin.

 

Population Estimate

The current maximum population size is 99 (45 F, 52 M, 2 U). As of 1 April, most Whooping Cranes have completed migration and are in Wisconsin. However, a few have not yet migrated and are in Illinois, Indiana, Arkansas, Tennessee, Alabama, and Florida. A few breeding pairs have begun nest building and a nesting update will be in next month’s report.

 

Read more »


 

March 1, 2017, Project Update

This is the most recent update for the Eastern Migratory Population of Whooping Cranes. During February, most Whooping Cranes began migration and at least one has returned to Wisconsin.

 

Population Estimate

The current maximum population size is 101 (46 F, 53 M, 2 U). As of 1 March, Whooping Cranes have been confirmed in Indiana, Illinois, Kentucky, Arkansas, Tennessee, Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, and Wisconsin. Many birds have begun moving north by the end of February, so the distribution is changing daily.

 

Read more »

 


 

February 1, 2017, Project Update

This is the most recent update for the Eastern Migratory Population of Whooping Cranes. During January, most Whooping Cranes stayed at their wintering areas and few moved short distances. A huge thank-you to the staff of Operation Migration, the Fish and Wildlife Service, the Department of Natural Resources, the International Crane Foundation, and all of the volunteers who help us keep track of the cranes throughout the year. We appreciate your contribution to the recovery of the whooping crane eastern migratory population.

 

Population Estimate

The current maximum population size is 103 (47 F, 54 M, 2 U). As of 1 February, at least 30 Whooping Cranes have been confirmed in Indiana, 3 in Illinois, 7 in Kentucky, 2 in Arkansas, 10 in Tennessee, 27 in Alabama, 6 in Florida, 5 in Georgia, and 1 in Louisiana. The remaining birds’ locations have not been reported during January.

 

Read more »


 

January 1, 2017, Project Update

Below is the most recent update for the Eastern Migratory Population of Whooping Cranes. In the last month most Whooping Cranes have begun migration or reached their wintering areas. A huge thank-you to the staff of Operation Migration, the Fish and Wildlife Service, the Department of Natural Resources, the International Crane Foundation, and all of the volunteers who help us keep track of the cranes throughout the year. We appreciate your contribution to the recovery of the whooping crane eastern migratory population.

 

Population Estimate

The current maximum population size is 104 (48 F, 54 M, 2 U). As of 1 January, at least 35 Whooping Cranes have been confirmed in Indiana, 3 in Illinois, 6 in Kentucky, 7 in Tennessee, 28 in Alabama, 5 in Florida, 4 in Georgia, and 1 in Louisiana. The remaining birds’ locations have not been reported during December.

 

Read more »


 

 

News, Project Updates and Feature Stories Archives