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Non-profit organizations, individuals and government agencies joining forces to bring a migratory population of whooping cranes back to eastern North America
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Project Updates

 

WCEP Annual Reports: reports that summarize the yearly activity of the partnership and the progress made towards the goal of establishing a migratory population of whooping cranes in the eastern U.S.

 

2017

Oct. 1, 2017

Sept. 1, 2017

August 1, 2017

July 1, 2017

June 1, 2017

May 1, 2017

April 1, 2017

March 1, 2017

February 1, 2017

January 1, 2017

 

2016

December 1, 2016

November 1, 2016

October 4, 2016

September 1, 2016

August 1, 2016

July 5, 2016

June 1, 2016

March 2016

January 2016

 

2015

November 2015

Sept. 7, 2015

July 27, 2015

July 22, 2015

May 28 to June 30, 2015

May 5 to 28, 2015

April 1 to May 4, 2015

April 16 and 18, 2015

 

April 14, 2015

Our partners at Necedah National Wildlife Refuge report a total of 52 whooping cranes have been detected on the Refuge. Several pairs have been observed unison calling, foraging, preening, and displaying territorial behavior (i.e. chasing sandhills). Weather on the refuge has been moderate with large amounts of rain. Although we do not expect any nests have been lost, the water level in several pools with nesting cranes has rapidly increased. 

 

10 whooping crane pairs have been observed incubating.

 

March 1 to 31, 2015

February 1 to 28, 2015

January 1 to 31, 2015

 

2014

December 5 to 31, 2014

December 15, 2014

November 6 to December 6, 2014

October 1 to November 5, 2014

August 18 to September 30, 2014

July 16 to August 14, 2014

 

August 12 , 2014, Project Update

Eva Szyszkoski, WCEP Tracking Field Manager confirmed that wild-hatched Whooping crane chick #W3-14 has officially FLEDGED! Eva was able to capture this stunning photograph as evidence and to share with everyone.

 

June 15 to July 15, 2014

May 1 to June 15, 2014 - - Nesting Summary

 

June 5, 2014

Unfortunately, male whooping crane no. 1-01 was removed from the population on 28 May because of repeated inadequate and uncorrectable behaviors at the Volk Field National Guard Base. He was transferred to Zoo New England in Boston, Massachusetts, on 29 May where he will remain in captivity.

 

In a June 5th email from Zoo New England, officials tell us crane 1-01 is doing very well and seems to be a very calm bird

 

March 1 to April 30, 2014 - - Nesting Summary

December 16, 2013 to February 28, 2014

 

2013

November 15 to December 15, 2013

September 1 to November 14, 2013

June 16 to August 31, 2013

 

July 17, 2013

Wild-hatched Chicks Update: Sadly, pair #5-10 and #28-08 lost their remaining chick, #W1-13.  Pair #9-03 and #3-04 re-nested and have hatched at least one chick, #W3-13!  Pair #7-07 and #39-07 had a late first nest but did not hatch any chicks (two eggs were recovered from their nest).

 

May 2 to June 15, 2013

April 4 to May 1, 2013

March 6 to April 3, 2013

February 4 to March 5, 2013

January 5 to February 3, 2013

 

2012

November 10, 2012 to January 4, 2013

October 11 to November 12, 2012 - known locations of whooping cranes in the eastern migratory flock, including DAR first year cranes

Spring 2012 Updates

2012 Spring Nesting Table - Nest survey results and adult crane locations

20 February – 20 March 2012 - Known locations of the Whooping Cranes in the Eastern Migratory Population

 

2010

December: Project Update

September: Wild Whooping Crane Chick Banded

August 2010: Project Update

July 2010: Project Update

July 21, 2010: Young Whooping Cranes Will Learn Migration Route from their Elders

July 1, 2010: First Whooping Cranes of the "Class of 2010" Arrive at Necedah National Wildlife Refuge

June 2010: Project Update

June 3, 2010: Wild Whooping Crane Chicks Hatch at Necedah National Wildlife Refuge

April 2010: Project Update

March 10, 2010: Project Update

February 2010: Project Update

January 21, 2010: Ultralight-led Whooping Cranes Arrive at Final Wintering Destination in Florida

January 14, 2010: Ultralight-led Whooping Cranes Arrive at First Wintering Destination in Florida

January 7, 2010: Ultralight Migration Leads 20 Endangered Whooping Cranes into Georgia

 

2009

October 2009: Project Update

September 2009: Project Update

August 2009: Project Update

May 2009: Project Update

April 2009: Project Update

March 2009: Project Update

February 2009: Project Update

January 22, 2009: Arrival at Hapata

January 2009: Project Update

 

2008

WCEP Year in Review - 2008

December 2008: Project Update

November 2008: Project Update

October 17, 2008: Ultralight-led migration begins

October: St. Marks NWR - Local ROTC helps St. Marks NWR Prepare for Whooping Crane Arrival

October: Chassahowitzka NWR - Pen Repair and Maintenance

October 2008 - New route for fall ultralight-led migration

September 2008 - Project Update

June 26, 2008 First Whooping Cranes of the "Class of 2008" Arrive at Necedah National Wildlife Refuge

 

2007

 

May 1, 2007 WCEP Statement on the Death of Crane 15-06

 

"Class of 2006" Mortalities

Severe storms swept through northwest and central Florida on February 1 and February 2, 2007. The storms killed 17 of our 18 "Class of 2006" whooping cranes at a remote pen site on the Chassahowitzka National Wildlife Refuge, Florida. Follow the links below to learn more about this event and how WCEP responded.

 

June 2007: Review of Unusual Mortality of 17 Juvenile Whooping Cranes on February 1 & 2, 2007

 

April 17, 2007 WCEP Statement on the Cause of Death of 17 Juvenile Whooping Cranes

 

March 15, 2007 Review of Unusual Mortality Event

 

2006

Wisconsin Whooping Crane Management Plan (December 2006)

 

The reintroduced flock produces its first wild-hatched chicks (June 23, 2006 News Release)

 

Photos of the first wild-hatched chick

 

2004

Whooping Crane "Class of 2004": Daily updates on the Fall 2004 Ultralight-led migration

 

2003

Whooping Crane "Class of 2003": Daily updates on their first migration

 

2003 Fall Activity of the 2001 and 2002 Cohorts

October

November 1

November 9

November 17

November 24

 

April 9, 2003: Spring migration update

 

2002

 

Winter 2002: Weekly Updates on Whooping Crane Activity in Florida

 

Fall: Daily updates from the ultralight-led migration

 

September 2002: Status Report on the First Cohort of Migratory Whooping Cranes Reintroduced Into Eastern North America

 

June 2002 Project Update

 

May 6 to 16, 2002 - Update on 2001 Cohort

 

Spring: Wild whooping cranes return to Wisconsin

 

2001

December 2001 Whooping Crane Project Update

 

For the first time whooping cranes are trained to follow ultralight aircraft with a successful fall migration to Florida - Daily Updates from the 2001 Whooping Crane Fall Migration

 

 

Sandhill Cranes from Last Year's Migration Study with Ultralight Aircraft have Left Their Wintering Area (March 16, 2001)

 

Ultralight-led Sandhill Cranes Return to Necedah National Wildlife Refuge (May 1, 2001)

 

 

Video from the 2001 Migration

 

2000

Sandhill Crane Study - Ultralight-led Migration by Proxy

From spring through fall of 2000, sandhill crane chicks were taught to migrate from Wisconsin to Florida by following an ultralight aircraft.  This was an experiment to test the theory that humans (disguised as cranes) could teach young cranes a migration route.  In subsequent years, the same techniques (with modifications) have been used to reintroduce a migratory whooping crane population to the eastern U.S.

 

Read More >>

 

1994

Whooping Crane Recovery Plan (PDF): recommends establishing a migratory eastern population of whooping cranes.


 

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